Disconnect
Reviewed by Mitchell Burns

Directed by: Henry Alex Rubin Starring: Jason Bateman        Also Starring: Frank Grillo
                                                                        Hope Davis                                          Michael Nyqvist
                                                                        Paula Patton                                        Jonah Bobo 
                                                                        Alexander Skarsgård                          Max Thieriot        
                                                                        Andrea Riseborough                           Colin Ford

I meant to review Disconnect a month or two ago when I watched it but never got around to it and I just figured I would never review it on this here blog. But then, I saw Disconnect was just released on DVD September 17th, 2013, so I just had to review it.
Disconnect is three separate stories, these three separate stories connect and intertwine in a few ways. I will try and sum up the three stories without spoilers. 
The first story follows a family of four, Rich Boyd (Jason Bateman) the father, Lydia Boyd (Hope Davis) the mother, Abby Boyd (Haley Ramm) the daughter, and Ben Boyd (Jonah Bobo) the son. This story revolves around the son, who has met a girl online and unbeknownst to him the girl is actually two boys (Collin Ford and Aviad Bernstein) faking interest in Ben. 
The Second story follows a married couple, Derek (Alexander Skarsgård) and Cindy (Paula Patton), whose lives are turned upside down when they fall victim to identity theft. When the police and a private detective, Mike (Frank Grillo) prove to be ineffective in helping them, the couple take matters into their own hands.
The third story follows a successful reporter, Nina Dunham (Andrea Riseborough) looking for a sweet story. She decides to dig into the world of online video chat room stripping; through one site in particular she meets Kyle (Max Thieriot). Kyle decides to meet Nina face to face for an interview, little do they know, they both end up wanting more out of the other than they can give. 
The title of the movie, Disconnect, is a double entendre; it could mean that because of the Internet and computers we are disconnected. It could be also be a warning, which we need to disconnect. The movie itself is a warning; it’s a message to all of us about the dangers of our wired world. 
The best storyline in the movie is the story of the family of four. The entire family acts the hell out of this movie; it’s the best acting I’ve ever seen from Jason Bateman. The Boyd family is a perfect example of the typical North American family. When the Boyd family hits rough times, its emotional to watch as each of these family bonds become tested. 

The story of Nina Dunham may be the weakest storyline, but it’s still quite interesting. Andrea Riseborough is proving to be quite the actress, she was the best part of Oblivion. 

The story of the husband and wife who are victims of identity thief is scary because it could happen to any of us. Eric Northman and Robin Thicke’s wife do a pretty great job portraying this couple whose relationship goes through a roller coaster. Alexander Skarsgård is the indie movie king this year, between Disconnect, What Maisie knew and The East I’ve seen him quite a bit this year. 

Disconnect can be a bit too didactic and preachy, each story is basically the worst outcome in any each of these situations, but it still speaks true. 
At its best, Disconnect is a moving and scary portrait of the world we live in, It’s suspenseful and a must watch for any computer owner. 
My Grade: A- 

Thanks for Reading,
Mitch Burns, The Hollywood Persona.
      

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